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Ucross View to the BigHorns

Ucross View to the BigHorns
Clearmont View to the BigHorns

Surface Geology north of Ucross View to the BigHorns

What a wonderful glacial terrain. The geologist in me sees all sorts of evidence of past glaciers in this valley. Dozens and dozens of “signs”. First of course is the obvious proximity to a 13,000 foot mountain chain. In the last 1/2 million years we have had 5 glaciations advance and retreat in North America (world wide too). We are in an interglacial period at the moment and a mild one fortunately for us. Warm is good, cold means famine historically.

If you look at the valley floor in this scene, note the bumpy nature of the terrain. Each of those bumps is a pile of gravel with all sorts of geomorphological names depending on their shape and relationship to the glacier that was running through this valley. They are all water sorted gravels in various kinds of shapes and sizes. The gravel piles were mostly formed as the glacier receded and left it’s gravel load behind as the ice melted. The geomorphologists out there call glacial gravel “Boulder Clay” because that is pretty much what it is. Boulders and smaller all mixed up.

The rounded mound in the foreground caught my attention. I think (as I didn’t walk out there) that it is bedrock based on the vegetation change at the top. Those upper layers were very hard and resisted the erosion that removed all around it protecting the softer material below. The aforementioned glacier looks like it rode over it giving it that rounded mound like appearance. Classic.

Location: Just outside of Ucross Wyoming

Title: Ucross View to the BigHorns

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Just North of Gillette Wyoming

Just North of Gillette Wyoming
Just North of Gillette Wyoming

I took this on the road just north of Gillette Wyoming. It is in the Little Powder River Valley where that 6 foot across river (currently) eroded all this Alluvial Fan Deposit away…it’s actually traceable way back to the Big Horn Mountains 100 miles away. (Tullock Formation of Tertiary age).
This is located just north of the coal measures being mined at the surface.
When the geology is traced back, the undertanding that the hills on the other side of this valley connect layer by layer with this side. Lot of work for such a little river🤔

Anybody notice the small herd of antelope on the lower left??